Intensifying your speech

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A few days ago I watched an old movie.
It was so boring that I fell asleep while watching it.

Sleeping in the cinema

I could’ve just said that the movie was boring, but I wanted to give you a better idea about how I felt so I used “so”.

We call words like that intensifiers. What they do is give a better idea of what we talk about.

Let’s look at a few intensifiers.

The most common intensifiers are very and really.

The English test was really hard.

John was very unhappy to see his ex-wife.

They made the adjectives hard and unhappy stronger to give us an idea of how people felt.

When it comes to so, I use it instead of very very, like in the first example, or when I know the extent:

Why is he so slow? We always have to wait for him.

In this case, I use so to emphasize that he is slower than me and my friends so I know exactly how slow he is.

Some intensifiers can weaken the words we use with them, like quite and a bit.

I was a bit tired after traveling around the city for 6 hours.

Joe felt quite lonely after his best friend had moved to another city.

Sad and lonely man

In the first sentence, I meant that I’m not very tired, while in the second one, Joe may not suffer as much as we think. 🙂

Let’s also look at too and enough.

You’re driving too fast. Slow down!

What too means in the first sentence is faster than necessary (And I hope you’ll never have to say that to your friends who drive) 🙂

I don’t think he’s smart enough for the job.

Take a look at both sentences above? Notice anything different?

That’s right. The words have a different order. Enough always goes after the adjective.

Hope I didn’t give you too much information today, so now let’s practice the intensifiers a bit.

Do you ever feel too tired to do anything? In these situations, do you motivate yourself to do something or just take a short rest? I’d love to hear your ideas and advice in the comments.

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